Quotes

Random collection of quotes attributed to Mingyur Rinpoche, mostly from the web. If you have some to add please drop me a line. Newly added quotes will appear on the top of this list of gems.

  • Meditation isn’t something separate from your life. It is your life.
  • Once you begin following after a thought, you lose touch with what’s happening in the here and now, and you begin imagining all sorts of fantasizes, judgments, memories, and hoer scenarios that may have nothing to do with he reality of present moment. And the more you allow yourself to get caught up in this type of mental wandering, the easier it becomes to drift away from the openness of the present moment.
  • Thoughts, emotions and sensations come and go in awareness, the way galaxies, stars, and planets move through space. Just as space isn’t defined by the objects that move through it, awareness isn’t defined or limited by the thoughts, emotions, perceptions, and so on that is apprehends.
  • The absolute can only be comprehended through experience.
  • Focusing on the breath is particularly useful when you catch yourself feeling stressed or distracted. Internally, the simple act of drawing attention to your breath produces a state of calmness and awareness that allows you to step back from whatever problems you might be facing and respond to them more calmly and objectively. If you’re stressed out, just bring your attention to your breathing. No one will notice that you’re meditating. They probably won’t even pay attention to the fact that you’re breathing at all.
  • Our real nature is infinite in scope.
  • That’s how to rest the mind in objectless shinay meditation: as though you’ve just finished a long day of work. Just let go and relax. You don’t have to block whatever thoughts, emotions, or sensations arise, but neither do you have to follow them. Just rest in the open present, simply allowing whatever happens to occur.
  • If we could see the whole truth of any situation, our only response would be one of compassion.
  • When you enter the path of Buddhist practice you’re ending an abusive relationship with yourself.
  • We choose ignorance because we can. We choose awareness because we can. Samsara and nirvana are simply different points of view based on choices we make in how to examine and understand our experience. There’s nothing magical about nirvana and nothing bad or wrong about samsara. If you’re determined to think of yourself as limited, fearful, vulnerable, or scarred by past experience, know only that you have chosen to do so, and that the opportunity to experience yourself differently is always available.
  • At any given moment, you can choose to follow the chain of thoughts, emotions, and sensations that reinforce a perception of yourself as vulnerable and limited, or to remember that your true nature is pure, unconditioned, and incapable of being harmed. You can remain in the sleep of ignorance, or remember that you are and always have been awake. Either way, you’re still expressing the unlimited nature of your true being. Ignorance, vulnerability, fear, anger, and desire are expressions of the infinite potential of your Buddha nature. There’s nothing inherently wrong or right with making such choices. The fruit of Buddhist practice is simply the recognition that these and other mental afflictions are nothing more or less than choices available to us because our real nature is infinite in scope.
  • Motivation is the single most important factor in determining whether your experience is conditioned by suffering of by peace.
  • As you start to see your own potential, you’ll also begin to recognize it in everyone around you. Buddha nature is not a special quality available to a privileged few.
  • All thoughts, perceptions, and physical sensations are, according to Buddhism, momentary expressions of the infinite possibility of emptiness.
  • Everything you think, everything you say, and everything you do is reflected back to you as your own experience.
  • When compassion awakens in your heart, you’re able to be more honest with yourself.
  • As with every mental experience, bliss, clarity, and nonconceptuality come and go. You didn’t create them, you didn’t cause them, and you can’t control them. They are simply natural qualities of the mind.
  • When you try to hold on to an experience like bliss or clarity, the experience looses it living, spontaneous quality, it becomes a concept, a dead experience. No matter how hard you try to make it last, it gradually fades. If you try to reproduce it later, you may get a taste of what you felt, but it will only be a memory, not the direct experience itself.
  • Each flash of bliss, clarity, or nonconceptuality is a spontaneous experience of the mind as it is at that particular moment.
  • It’s important to let go of any sensations of bliss, clarity, or nonconceptuality you may experience. Bliss, clarity and nonconceptuality are all very nice experience, and clear signs of having made a profound connection with the true nature of your mind. But there is a temptation, when such experiences occur, to hold on to them tightly and make them last. It’s okay to remember these experiences and appreciate them, but if you try to hang on to them or repeat them, you’ll eventually end up feeling disappointed and frustrated.
  • Experience is always changing, like the movement of clouds against the sky. Realization – the stable awareness of the true nature of your mind – is like the sky itself, an unchanging background against which shifting experience occur.
  • This is really the heart of shinay practice: the ability to notice and rest in the gaps between thoughts, emotions, and other mental events.
  • Join your awareness to the distraction.
  • Conditions are always changing, and real peace lies in the ability to adept to this changes.
  • Nonconceptuality is an experience of the total openness of your mind. Your awareness is direct and unclouded by conceptual distinction such as “I” or “other,” subjects and objects, or any other form of limitation. It’s an experience of pure consciousness as infinite as space, without beginning, middle, or end. It’s like becoming awake within a dream and recognizing that everything experienced in the dream isn’t separate from the mind of the dreamer.
  • Clarity is a sense of being able to see into the nature of things as though all reality were a landscape lit up on a brilliantly sunny day without clouds. Everything appears distinct and everything makes sense. Even disturbing thougths and emotions have their place in this brilliant landscape.
  • Bliss, in the way it was explained to me, is a feeling of undiluted happiness, comfort, and lightness in both the mind and the body. As this experience grows stronger, it seems as if everything you see is made of love. Even experiences of physical pain become very light and hardly noticeable at all.
  • One of the Buddha’s greatest gifts to humanity was the lesson that it’s possible to meditate anytime, anywhere. In fact, bringing meditation into your daily life is one of the main objectives of Buddhist practice. Any daily activity can be used as an opportunity for meditation. You can watch your thoughts as you go through your day, rest your attention momentarily on the experience of taste, smell, form, or sound, or simply rest for a few seconds on the marvelous experience of simply being aware of the experiences going on in your mind.
  • Dedication merit at the end of any practice is an aspiration that whatever psychological or emotional strength you’ve gained through practice be passed on to others – which is not only a wonderful short compassion practice but also an extremely subtle way to dissolving the distinction between “self” and “others.”
  • Meditation is not a competition.

  • Real diligence doesn’t mean forcing yourself beyond your natural limits; it means simply trying to do your best, rather than focusing on the result of what you’re trying to do accomplish.
  • The only difference between meditation and the ordinary, everyday process of thinking, feeling, and sensation is the application of the simple, bare awareness that occurs when you allow your mind to rest simply as it is-without chasing after thoughts or becoming distracted by feelings or sensations.
  • The mind is always moving, always processing new ideas, new perceptions, and new sensations. That’s its job. Meditation is about learning to work with the mind as it is, not about trying to force it into some sort of Buddhist straitjacket.
  • The point of working with supports for your meditation is to develop degree of mental stability that allows you to be aware of your own mind as it perceives things. Resting your mind between objectless meditation and object=based meditation gives you a chance to assimilate whatever you have experienced. By alternating between these two states, no matter what situation you find yourself in – whether you’re dealing with your own thoughts and emotions or with a person or a situation that appears “out there” – you’ll gradually learn to recognize that whatever is going on is intimately connected with your own awareness.
  • The most important thing is to learn how to rest your mind – to work with it instead of being worked by it.
  • The Tibetan word of meditation, gom, literally means “becoming familiar with,” and Buddhist meditation practice is really about becoming familiar with the nature of your own mind.
  • There is no greater inspiration, no greater courage, than the intention to lead all beings to the perfect freedom and complete well-being of recognizing their true nature.
  • Absolute bodhicitta is the direct insight into the nature of mind. Within absolute bodhicitta, or the absolutely awakened mind, there is no distinction between subject and object, self and other; all sentient beings are spontaneously recognized as perfect manifestation of Buddha nature.
  • The mind is not a thing but an event.
  • Whatever you experience when you simply rest your attention on whatever’s going on in your mind at any given moment is meditation. Simply resting in this way is the experience of natural mind.
  • Compassion is essentially the recognition that everyone and everything is a reflection of everyone and everything else.
  • A compassionate mind is a diligent mind.
  • In world bereft of compassion, the only way we can work together through the enforcement of outside agencies: police, armies, and the laws and weapons to back them up. But if we could learn to develop loving-kindness and compassion towards one another – a spontaneous understanding that whatever we do to benefit ourselves must benefit others and vice versa – we wouldn’t need laws or armies, police, guns, or bombs. In other words, the best form of security we can offer ourselves is to develop an open heart.
  • The degree to which any experience repels, frightens, or seems to weaken us is equal to the degree to which such experience can make us stronger, more confident, more open, and more able to accept the infinite possibilities of our Buddha nature
  • Every mental affliction is actually the basis of wisdom. If we get caught up in our afflictions or try to repress them, we just end up creating more problems for ourselves. If, instead, we look at them directly, the things we fear will kill us gradually transform into the strongest supports for meditation we could ever hope for.
    Mental afflictions are not enemies. They are our friends.
  • Because emotions tend to be vivid and enduring, they can be even more useful than thoughts as supports for meditation.
  • As long as you maintain awareness or mindfulness, no matter what happens when you practice, your practice is meditation. If you watch thoughts, that is meditation. If you can’t watch your thoughts, that is meditation, too. Any of these experience can be supports for meditation. The essential thing is to maintain awareness, no matter what thoughts, emotions, sensations occur. If you remember that awareness of what occurs is meditation, then meditation becomes much easier than you may think.
  • Meditation is a uniquely personal process, and no two people’s experience is alike.
  • Whatever we experience, as long as you aware of what’s going on, is meditation.
  • When you don’t understand the nature and origin of your thoughts, your thoughts use you. When the Buddha recognized the nature of his mind, he reversed the process. He showed us how we use our thoughts instead of being used by them.
  • For most of us, freedom feels not only unfamiliar but distinctly unpleasant. That’s because we’re used to our chains. They might chafe, they might make us bleed, but at least they’re familiar.
  • Alternating between focusing on an object and allowing the mind to rest in naked awareness, you actually come to recognize the basic truth that neuroscience has shown us. Everything we perceive is a reconstruction created in the mind.
  • The Buddha recognized that no two people are exactly alike, that everyone is born with a unique combination of abilities, qualities, and temperaments. It is a measure of his great insight and compassion that he was able to develop an enormous variety of methods through which all sorts of people might arrive at a direct experience of their true nature and become completely free from suffering.
  • If we continue to simply allow ourselves to be aware of the activity of our minds, we’ll gradually come to recognize the transparent nature of our thoughts, emotions, sensations, and perceptions we once considered solid and real. It’s as though layers of dust and dirt were slowly being wiped away from the surface of a mirror. As we grow accustomed to looking at the clear surface of our minds, we can see through all the gossip about who and what we think we are, and recognize the shining essence of our true nature.
  • Meditation is a process of nonjudgemental awareness.
  • The real point of meditation is to rest in bare awareness whether anything occurs or not. Whatever comes up for you, just be open and present to it, and let it go. And if nothing occurs, or if thoughts and so on vanish before you can notice them, just rest in that natural clarity.
  • The mind is always active, always generating thoughts, just as the ocean always generates waves. We can’t stop our thoughts any more than we can stop waves in the ocean. Resting the mind in its natural state is very different from trying to stop thoughts altogether. Buddhist meditation does not in any way involve attempting to make the mind blank. There’s no way to achieve thoughtless meditation. Even if you could manage to stop your thoughts, you wouldn’t be meditating; you’d just be drifting in a zombielike state
  • In very simple terms, the most effective approach to meditation is to try your best without focusing too much on the results.
  • Learn how to use our own experience as a support for practice, without regard to results.
    The sounds, sights, and smells of rush-hour traffic can become an overwhelming source of preoccupation, the practice of simply observing the sensations of traffic rather than focusing on the goal of getting through congestion offers a tremendous opportunity for meditation practice.
  • Samsara refers to the wheel or circle of unhappiness, a habit of running around in circles, chasing after the same experience again and again, each time expecting a different result. If you’ve ever watched a dog or a cat chasing its own tail, you’ve seen the essence of samsara. And even though it might be funny to watch an animal chase its tail, it’s not so funny when your own mind does the same thing.
  • Ignorance is a fundamental inability to recognize the infinite potential, clarity, and power of our own minds, as if we were looking at the world through colored glasses: Whatever we see is disguised or distorted by the colors of the glass. On the most essential level, ignorance distorts the basically open experience of awareness into dualistic distinctions between inherently existing categories of “self” and “other”.
  • Compassion is the spontaneous wisdom of the heart. It’s always with us. It always has been, and always will be. When it arises in us, we’ve simply learned to see how strong and safe we are already.
  • The more we allow ourselves to be guided by compassion – to pause for a moment and try to see where another person is coming from – the less likely we are to engage in conflict.
  • Compassion, in Tibetan terms, is a spontaneous feeling of connection with all living things. What you feel, I feel; what I feel, you feel. There’s no difference between us.
  • To the extend that you can acknowledge the true power of your mind, you can begin to exercise more control over your experience. Pain, sadness, fear, anxiety, and all other forms of suffering no longer disrupt your life as forcefully as they used to. Experiences that once seemed to be obstacles become opportunities for deepening your understanding of the mind’s unimpeded nature.
  • Everything you perceive, you perceive through the power of your awareness. There are truly no limits to the creative ability of your mind. This creative aspect is the natural consequence of the union of emptiness and clarity. It is known in Tibetan as magakpa, or “unimpededness”. Sometimes magakpa is translated as “power” or “ability”, but the meaning is the same: the freedom of the mind to experience anything and everything whatsoever.
  • The habit of thinking that things exist “out there” in the world or “in here” is hard to give up, though. It means letting go of all the illusions you cherish, and recognizing that everything you project, everything you think of as “other”, is in fact a spontaneous expression of your own mind. It means letting go of ideas about reality and instead experiencing the flow of reality as it is.
  • Like emptiness, the true nature of clarity is impossible to define completely without turning it into some sort of concept that you can tuck away in a mental pocket, thinking. Okay, I get it, my mind is clear, now what? Clarity in its pure form has to be experienced. And when you experience it, there’s no “Now what?” You just get it.
  • The essence of meditation practice is to let go of all your expectations about meditation. All the qualities of your natural mind – peace, openness, relaxation, and clarity – are present in your mind just as it is. You don’t have to do anything different. You don’t have to shift or change your awareness. All you have to do while observing your mind is to recognize the qualities it already has.
  • From the Buddhist perspective emptiness and awareness are indivisible. You can’t separate emptiness from awareness any more than you can separate wetness from water or heat from fire. Your real nature, in other words, in not only unlimited in its potential, but also completely aware.
  • As we contemplate the enormous variety of factors that must come together to produce a specific sense of self, our attachment to this “I” we think we are begins to loosen. We become more willing to let go of the desire to control or block our thoughts, emotions, sensations, and so on and begin to experience them without pain and guilt, absorbing their passage simply as manifestation of a universe of infinite possibilities. In so doing, we regain the innocent perspective most of us knew as children. Our hearts open up to others, like flowers blossoming. We become better listeners, more fully aware of everything going on around us, and are able to respond more spontaneously and appropriately to situations that used to trouble or confuse us. Gradually, perhaps on a level so subtle we might not even notice it’s happening, we find ourselves awakening to a free, clear, loving state of mind beyond our wildest dreams. But it takes great patience to learn how to see such possibilities. In fact it takes great patience to see.
  • Whether we’re analyzing material objects, time, our “self”, or our mind, eventually we reach a point where we realize that our analysis breaks down. At that point our search for something irreducible finally collapses. In that moment, when we give up looking for something absolute, we gain our first taste of emptiness, the infinite, indefinable essence of reality as it is.
  • You can break down the present into smaller and smaller increments, but between the instant of present experience and the instant you identify that instant as “now”, the moment has already passed. It is not longer now. It’s then.
  • Whatever we experience is in essence an expression of our buddhanature.
  • Dissolving the distinction between subject and object doesn’t mean that perception becomes a great big blur. You still continue to perceive experience in terms of subject and object, while at the same time recognizing that the distinction is essentially conceptual. In other words, the perception of an object is not different from the mind that perceives.
  • The practice of meditation over a long period dissolves artificial distinctions between subject and object – which in turn offers the perceiver the freedom to determine the quality of his or her own experience, the freedom to distinguish between what is real and what is merely an appearance.
  • Buddhist training offers an alternative approach to experiencing life from an essentially fear-based perspective of survival in favor of experiencing it as a parade of odd and wonderful things.
  • Nothing in your experience – your thoughts, feelings, or sensations – is as fixed and unchangeable as it appears. Your perception are only crude approximations of the true nature of things. Actually, the universe in which you live and the universe in your mind form an integrated whole.
  • Many people mistakenly believe meditation involves deliberately stopping the natural movement of thoughts and emotions. It’s possible to block this movements for a little while and even achieve a fleeting sense of peace – but it’s the peace of a zombie. A completely thoughtless, emotionless state is a state devoid of discernment or clarity.
  • If you chase after thoughts and emotions, if you let them lead you, they begin to define you, and you lose you ability to respond openly and spontaneously in the present moment. On the other hand, if you attempt to block your thoughts, your mind can become quite tight and small.
  • Emptiness, or infinite possibility, is the absolute nature of reality. Everything that appears out of emptiness – stars, galaxies, people, tables, lamps, clocks, and even our perception of time and space – is a relative expression of infinite possibility, a momentary appearance in the context of infinite time and space.
  • The relationship between emptiness and experience isn’t so simple – or rather, it’s so simple that it’s easy to miss.
  • Wherever you are, whatever you do, it’s essential to acknowledge your experience as something ordinary, the natural expression of your true mind. If you don’t try yo stop whatever is going on in your mind, but merely observe it, eventually you’ll begin to feel a tremendous sense of relaxation, a vast sense of openness within your mind – which is in fact the natural mind, the naturally unperturbed background against which various thoughts come and go.
  • According to the Buddha, the basic nature of mind can be directly experienced simply by allowing the mind to rest as it is.
  • In a sense, we’re homesick for our true nature.
  • The yearning most of us feel for a lasting happiness is the “small, still voice” of the natural mind, reminding us of what we’re really capable of experiencing.
  • Because the true nature of all living creatures is already completely free from suffering and endowed with perfect happiness: In seeking happiness and avoiding unhappiness, regardless of how we go about it, we’re all just expressing the essence of who we are.
  • The Buddha said that the desire to achieve lasting happiness and to avoid unhappiness is the one unmistakable sign of the presence of the natural mind.
  • It’s the same for all of us. As long as we don’t recognize our real nature, we suffer. When we recognize our nature, we become free from suffering. Whether you recognize it or not, though, its qualities remain unchanged. But when you begin to recognize it in yourself, you change, and the qualities of your life change as well. Things you never dreamed possible begin to happen.
  • The goal of attention, or shamatha, practice is to become aware of awareness. Awareness is the basis, or what you might call the “support,” of the mind. It is steady and unchanging, like the pole to which the flag of ordinary consciousness is attached. When we recognize and become grounded in awareness, the “wind” of emotion may still blow. But instead of being carried away by the wind, we turn our attention inward, watching the shifts and changes with the intention of becoming familiar with that aspect of consciousness that recognizes Oh, this is what I’m feeling, this is what I’m thinking. As we do so, a bit of space opens up within us. With practice, that space—which is the mind’s natural clarity—begins to expand and settle.
  • Happiness and unhappiness are not primarily created by the material world or the physical body. First and foremost, they are decisions of the mind.
  • Without meditation, our mind is like a crazy monkey that we cannot control.
  • The untrained mind moves like a string of beads. Hopes and fears come one after another. In tranquility meditation, just drop the chain of beads… but once the beads are dropped, don’t try to rearrange them!
  • Purify the mind to the subtlest level. Bit by bit, develop the qualities of realized beings. The mind becomes naturally free, clear and vast.
  • Buddha taught us wisdom and skillful means. These are like the two wings of a bird!
  • Devotion to the spiritual teacher brings us blessings when we practice the teachings of the lineage and trust in our innate Buddha nature.
  • If we try too hard, meditation becomes difficult. But it is so easy… Meditation is resting in our own natural awareness.
  • By nature, the essence of our mind is total peace. Therefore, we can find true peace of mind through meditation.
  • Taking a drink of water by grasping with hope and fear only causes the water to spill and leaves the arm sore. We function best when relaxed and mindful.
  • Anger needs no training to grow. On the relative level, compassion requires training. Relative compassion is like an illusion, but a good illusion that causes other illusions to dissipate.
  • At the beginning of meditation training, we identify (1) the observer, (2) the observed, and (3) the observing act. As our practice matures, these three become indistinguishable.
  • To diminish grasping at appearances as if they have a real essence, watch all things as if they were reflections in a mirror.
  • What is the essence of bodhichitta? The essence of bodhichitta is the heart that thinks, I alone, personally, will establish all sentient beings in the state of complete enlightenment.
  • Like space, natural mind isn’t dependent on prior causes and conditions. It simply is: immeasurable, and beyond characterization.
  • Although the true nature of the mind can’t be described directly, that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t at least try to develop some theoretical understanding about it. Even a limited understanding is at least a sign-post, pointing the way towards direct experience.
  • For most of us, our natural mind or Buddha nature is obscured by the limited self-image created by habitual neuronal patterns – which, in themselves, are simply reflection of the unlimited capacity of the mind to create any conditions is chooses. Natural mind is capable of producing anything, even ignorance of its own nature. In other words, not recognizing natural mind is simply an example of the mind’s unlimited capacity to create whatever it wants.
  • Habits can be unlearned.
  • When the mind is colored by dualistic perspective, every experience – even moments of joy and happiness – is bounded by some sense of limitation. There’s always a but lurking in the background.
  • You are not the limited person you think you are. Any trained Buddhist teacher can tell you with all the conviction of personal experience that, really, you’re the very heart of compassion, completely aware, and fully capable of achieving the greatest good, not only for yourself, but for everyone and everything that you can imagine.
  • Confusion is the first step on the path of real well-being.
  • Whatever we are, whatever we do, all we need to do is recognize our thoughts, feelings, and perceptions as something natural. Neither rejecting nor accepting, we simply acknowledge the experience and let it pass. If we keep this up, we’ll eventually find ourselves becoming able to manage situations we once found painful, scary, sad. We’ll discover a sense of confidence that isn’t rooted in arrogance or pride. We’ll realize that we’re always sheltered, always safe, and always home.
  • The key – the how of Buddhist practice – lies in learning to simply rest in a bare awareness of thoughts, feelings, and perceptions as they occur. In the Buddhist tradition, this gentle awareness is known as mindfulness, which, in turn, is simply resting in the mind’s natural clarity.
  • Because having a mind is such a basic condition of our experience, most of us take it for granted. We don’t bother to ask ourselves what is it that thinks.
  • The more precisely scientists scrutinize mental activity, the more closely they approach the Buddhist understanding of mind as a perpetually evolving event rather than a distinct entity.
  • Any attempt to capture the direct experience of the nature of mind in words is impossible. The beat that can be said is that the experience is immeasurably peaceful, and, once stabilized through repeated experience, virtually unshakable.
  • The Buddha didn’t try to convince people.
  • Instead of rejecting the problems and emotions, or surrendering to them, we can befriend them, working through them to reach an enduring, authentic experience of our inherent wisdom, confidence, clarity, and joy.
  • When you don’t understand the nature and origin of thoughts, your thoughts use you.
  • Buddhism is very practical. It’s about doing things that foster serenity, happiness and confidence.
  • The opportunity to experience yourself differently is always available.
  • Are you confused? Great! Confusion is a big breakthrough: a sign of cutting through attachment.
  • Awareness is the basis, or what you might call the “support,” of the mind.
  • Since all experience emerges through causes and conditions, there is nothing that is not emptiness.
  • A broken heart is an open heart.
  • The mind is always active, always generating thoughts, just as the ocean constantly generates waves.
  • The mind that grasps is the same mind that sets us free.
  • Buddhist meditation does not in any way involve attempting to make the mind blank.
  • Take your life on the path, your life, exactly as it is—right here, right now.
  • When we recognize and become grounded in awareness of awareness, the “wind” of emotion may still blow.
  • The qualities of buddha nature are beyond conception but charged with possibility.
  • Emptiness is an open-ended potential for any and all sorts of experience to appear or disappear.
  • The Buddha taught that the body is a support for the mind like a glass and the water it contains.
  • All that we meet in daily life stems from a fundamental capacity to experience anything whatsoever.
  • Awareness simply is.
  • Just as we need sound to look at sound, form to look at form, we need emotions to look at emotions.
  • When we take the time to look at the way we see things, the way we see things changes.
  • Meditation is about learning to recognize our basic goodness in the immediacy of the present moment.
  • You are Buddha right now and right here.
  • Impermanence has its advantages, thoughts and feelings aren’t as fixed or solid as they appear.
  • Motivation is the single most important factor in determining whether your experience is conditioned by suffer or by peace.
  • Clarity is part of the mind from the beginning, a natural awareness. Just acknowledge it, simply notice that you’re aware.
  • To cut through problems, we need problems.
  • When we become fixed in our perceptions we lose our ability to fly.
  • Clarity is always functioning even when we’re not consciously attentive to it.
  • Look directly at disturbing emotions and other problems we experience in our lives as stepping stones to freedom.
  • If everything were permanent, singular, or independent, nothing would change.
  • Use every distraction as an object of meditation and they cease to be distractions.
  • Letting go is not giving up.
  • We have to understand our basic situation in order to work with it.
  • If you have a hundred thoughts, you will have a hundred helpers in your meditation.
  • The Buddha taught that we can find our freedom only through embracing the conditions that trouble us.
  • When you transform your mind, everything you experience is transformed.
  • Practice is personal; no two people’s experiences are alike.
  • Best meditation is non-meditation.
  • Through the patient observation of the thoughts, emotions, and sensations we experience in any given moment, from which comes a gradual recognition that they are not inherently real things.
  • When you transform your mind, everything you experience is transformed. It’s like putting on a pair of yellow glasses: Suddenly, everything you see is yellow. If you put on a pair of green glasses, everything you see is green
  • All mental activity, in other words, evolves from the combined activity of bare perception and long-term neuronal associations. If I wanted to be happy, I had to learn to recognize and work with the conditioning factors that produce compulsive or trait-bound reactions.
  • Our everyday experience, we must recognize that the “whole truth” is that everyone just wants to be happy.If we could see the whole truth of any situation, our only response would be one of compassion.
  • Thinking is the natural activity of the mind. Meditation is not about stopping your thoughts, which is open to and naturally aware of thoughts, emotions, and sensations as they occur.
  • Freedom rarely arrives in the form we think it should.
  • Theoretical understanding alone is simply not enough to overcome the psychological and biological habits that create so much headache and pain in daily life. For real transformation to occur, theory has to be applied through practice.
  • The expectations that you bring to your meditation are often the greatest obstacles you will encounter.
  • Buddhism is not so much concerned with getting well as with recognizing that you are right here, right now as whole as good as essentially good as you ever could hope to be.


(as most of these quotes are just taken from the web I can’t promise that all these wonderful quotes are actually from Mingyur Rinpoche ~ yet they all sound very mingyur to me 🙂 )